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Kodak Supra 800 135×36 film 3 rolls EXPIRED 11/2001 kept mostly frozen LOMO HOLGA 3

10,00 

Kodak Professional Supra 800 135-35 EXP 11/2001
Kodak Professional Supra Films, technical data

In stock

Product Description

ALL FILMS HAVE EXPIRED, no guarantee of functioning is given!

PLEASE NOTE: I have the most time kept them in deep freeze (at least -18 degrees Celsius) and some of them I tested and they seemed to be ok.

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Please see all photos for more info/guidance & make your own judgment on condition etc.

Everything shown in the photos above is included in the sale, nothing more, nothing less!

All photos shown are of the actual item/s you are buying & what you will receive.

+ + + THE ITEMS ARE LOCATED IN FINLAND (EU) + + +

NO CUSTOMS TAX AND NO VAT TO THE ITEM PRICE IF YOU ARE IN EU + + +

SELLING AS A BUSINESS (BUT NO LOCAL VAT IS ADDED TO THIS ITEM!) SEE TERMS & CONDITIONS

PLEASE READ FULL DESCRIPTION BEFORE BUYING

MANY THANKS FOR LOOKING!

PLEASE CHECK OUT MY OTHER FILMS / CAMERAS / DARKROOM ITEMS FOR SALE,

MUCH MORE TO COME!

 

I bought these films new but already expired from a professional photo store in Espoo, Finland in around 2002, I think. According to my bookkeeping they were expired 11/2001. I kept ALL my films until July 2014 in deep fridge (at least -18 degrees Celsius) basically from the moment I got them. Then, as my company moved to a new location I had no more enough deep freeze place for all my films, including this film reel also. Inside, where the films have been stored, the room temperature has been ca. + 3 .. 10 degrees Celsius during wintertime (ca. November – April) and ca. + 10 .. 17 degrees Celsius at other times. During January – May 2016 ALL films were well covered outside at ca. -33 .. + 10 degrees Celsius and after that time I moved all my films inside (temperatures as above).

The Kodak Supra Professional 800 is fast speed film but old technology. This means that the grain is pretty high indeed, according to modern standards. Given the fact that these films are pretty old, the grain is more pronounced.

I mainly used color negs for gigs, and with those paid jobs there was less need to save money with spooling my own films. For paid gigs I didn’t use old films pretty much never, with printed magazines the grain would always be more or less an issue.

Also, privately, I was always too much of a tech guy who’d always admire the no-grain-aspect; hence Kodak Tech Pan was my controversial favorite (I would do the processing unorthodox and get similar results). ,)

Now, to be honest, the color negative films are the most sensitive to aging, which only freezing can withhold to some extent. Black-and-white films are just fine even with decades and decades of expiry, and to my experience, also slides are much better aging resistant than color negatives. So keeping this in mind, I tested one my Kodak Portra 400 ASA (VC, vivid colors) 120 films, which you can see and read about yourself in my blog pages. Looking more closely to the very last images, some of the scanned images indicate somewhat of a greenish cast visible in the darks, whilst others less of that cast. This is partly due my automated image processing methods. The best results are always got when the frame is cropped away, because the dark frame areas make the automated calculus go haywire. In this case I wanted to make the frames partly visible so that you would be able to read the film information. Yes, I have more than a thousand photos here, so guess how much manual stuff I’m interested in doing.. ,)

I didn’t test these Kodak Supra 800 films, as I saw there no point. They would not be the films you would use for anything serious where you expect those results from an unexpired film and even then, you’d probably choose low-grain technology films.

I do think these Kodak Supra 800 films are the perfect material for you if you’re keen on LOMO or HOLGA or other creative photography. Perhaps setting the ASA number a bit smaller (like 400 instead of 800) might be a good thing. Then, just point and shoot and drop the exposed film to your next one hour photo store, and be amazed what comes out! 😉

The Kodak Supra series were discontinued in 2003, and the specifications recommend using Portra films that have also been replaced by the new Portra series in 2011, so that the old Portra NC and Portra VC series have been merged together. Kodak still makes the Portra NEW series, and a 135-36 roll of Kodak Portra 800 costs in Finland 14.90 € including 24 % VAT in Telefoto, requiring a special order.

AS you can see from the photos, all these film cans are a bit rusted due to moisture in the deep freezer that has gone the film that unlucky me were not properly sealed. I believe the film inside the cans should be more or less ok. I am selling these three Kodak Supra 800 11/2001 expired 135-36 film rolls, starting 1 euros, with reserve and buy it now 10 euros. I have two sets like these to sell and you see photos of both of them. I have also four sets of 3 rolls in good cosmetic condition for auction.

Yes, of course I will combine shipping for reduced shipping costs. I urge you to my buy more from me and will be flexible with it. Please note the somewhat expensive shipping costs from Finland, especially if insurance is needed. If the value of order gets to a higher level, I insist on taken an insurance for the shipping.

If you buy this item – please keep it in deep freezer for best results! 🙂

If you have more questions, please contact me directly.

Klaus Riederer, PhD, MSc
KAR Oy Ab GmbH Ltd S. A. R. L., CEO www.kar.fi
© 2016 We-Love-Film-Cameras-Printing-Baking-KAR-Ltd-FI-Outlet

Additional Information

Weight 0.35 kg
Dimensions 15 x 15 x 5 cm

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